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1986

CANON RC-701 STILL VIDEO CAMERA - 1986.  Canon was the first to market a still video camera, the professional model RC-701 (one source states that the 1981 Sony Mavica was marketed, but this has not been independently verified as of yet).  The RC-701 was aimed mainly at the press market.  It had four dedicated interchangeable lenses and also offered an adapter for 35mm lenses.  Price of the RC (RC stood for Realtime Camera) with an 11-66mm f/1.2 lens was about $3,000.  The complete RC-701 system consisting of the camera, a player/recorder, a printer, a laminator, and a unit for phone transmission cost about $27,000.  The CCD was 6.6mm x 8.8mm with 780 pixels horizontally.  This was equal to about 300 horizontal and 320 vertical lines on a TV monitor.  The RC-701 had a swing-up mirror similar to a conventional SLR and had shutter speeds of 1/8 to 1/2000 second.  It could capture 1, 2, 5, or 10 frames per second.  Additional lenses included a 6mm f/1.6, comparable to a 24mm wide angle 35-mm lens, and a 50-150mm telephoto zoom.  Both lenses were for the RC-701 only and could not be used on other cameras.  Popular Photography, July 1986, p62.
http://www.canon.com/camera-museum/history/canon_story/f_index.html

CANON RC-701 Mirror System - Magazine aticles of the time stated that the RC-701 had a flip-up mirror similar to standard DSLR film cameras, but as shown by the photos above submitted by Tom Thiele of Germany, the RC-701 had an unusal mirror mechanism. Instead of flipping up, it moved downward and to the right as seen from the front. If you are fortunate enough to own a RC-701, check out this unusal mirror movement for yourself. Errors in reporting such as this by professional photography magazines make you wonder how much other misinformation is now permanently part of recorded history. Thanks to Tom Thiele for setting the record straight on this matter.

CANON RR-551 STILL VIDEO PLAYER/RECORDER - 1986. The player/recorder in the complete Canon system mentioned above was the RR-551, the world's first still video player/recorder to be marketed. The RR-551 shown above, in excellent condition, was purchased on eBay with manual, remote, floppies and several manufacturer's brochures for $25.
 

1.4MP CCD - 1986.  Kodak develops a 1.4 million pixel CCD.  Modern Photography, September 1986, p28. 

FIRST COMMERCIAL DIGITAL CAMERA - 1986.  MegaVision introduced a high-resolution 2000-line tube camera system called the Tessera, the very first digital camera to be used in commercial photographic applications.
www.mega-vision.com/about/about.htm

Digi-View Device
NEWTEK  Digi-View - 1986, 1987, 1989.    In 1986 the NewTek Digi-View, built to run on the Amiga platform, was the first inexpensive video digitizer designed for home computers. It was developed to take advantage of the Amiga 1000's advanced video capabilities. Digi-View was also the first personal computer digitizer to capture 4096-color, photo quality images.    Soon afterward, NewTek followed with DigiPaint, which provided video painting capabilities within the computer system. It was developed to take advantage of the Amiga 1000's advanced video capabilities and was plugged into the Amiga's parallel printer port. A video cable then lead from the digitizer to either a B&W video camera with a color wheel attached, or to an external color splitter box. The DigiView took 3 passes to digitize a frame, and each pass was done by filtering through one of 3 primary colors: red, green, and blue. This meant that the image being digitized had be still or paused. The digitizer generally captured at 320x200 pixels with up to 4096 colors, but was capable of 640x200 pixels if the system had sufficient memory.  Once all three captures were done, the Newtek software then merged them into a single color capture. Thanks to Patrick Murphy for providing information concering the Digi-View.
Digi-View B & W Photo  Digi-View Color Photo 1  Digi-View Color Photo 2 

Examples of photos captured with the Newtek Digi-View and the Digi-View digitizer .

http://www.amiga-hardware.com/showhardware.cgi?HARDID=307



 

 

 

NIKON SVC (Still Video Camera) PROTOTYPE - 1986.  This camera was built around a 2/3-inch CCD of 300 000 pixels.  It allowed the analog recording of 25 or 50 images on a small floppy disk of two inches, the same one as used by the Canon Ion to be marketed in 1988.  The body of the SVC was designed similar to that of the Nikon F801 film camera which was marketed two years later,  Two lenses were intended for the SVC, a 6mm f/1.6 and a 10 to 40mm f/1.4.  The Nikon SVC was shown at Photokina '85, but the electronics were mainly by panasonic.  Click on image to see enlarged view.

http://www.nikonweb.com/svc/

http://membres.lycos.fr/ncf/N2BE2.html

 


SONY MAVICA MVC-A7AF - 1986.  The A7AF was a still video camera which recorded images onto two-inch floppy disks (MP-50) and the first to provide audo annotation.  One disk could hold up to 50 images in Field mode or 25 images in Frame mode.  The Field mode recorded on a single track of the disk while the Frame mode required two tracks, but provided better quality images.  While recording in Field mode ISO rating was 160, and 80 for Frame mode.  The A7AF could also record 9.6 seconds of audio to accompany each image by use of an additional recording track.  Images were registered by a 2/3-inch charge coupled device (CCD) of 380,000 pixels.  The lens was a 6X zoom, 12-72mm, f/1.4-1.7, with macro capability.  The lens could be focused manually or automatically and had a focal plane shutter with speeds of 1/15 to 1/1000 second.   The viewfinder was TTL (through-the-lens) with an adjustment for individual eyesight.  The A7AF specifications included auto white balance, EV adjustment of + or -2 in 0.5 EV steps, shutter priority and AE modes, self-timer, remote control option (RM-S7), date indicator, and shoe for an optional flash (MFL-30).  Other options included an NP-4000 battery pack which could record approximately 50 disks per charge, a DCC-2600A car battery cord, an MVR-A770 still video recorder/player, and a variety of optional microphones to supplement the built-in microphone.  Normal operation was by six L40 (LR6) alkaline batteries and a button lithium battery (CR2025).  Supplied accessories were an eyepiece cover, lens hood, shoulder strap, and the CR2025 button lithium battery.  Unusual features of the A7AF included a recording head contamination indicator and a moisture condensation indicator. The A7AF was for recording only and playback required use of the Sony MVR-A770 still video recorder/player shown below.  Information concerning the A7AF is from an operating manual kindly provided by Mr. Charley Mack of Park West, Chicago.  Also see Understanding Electronic Photography, John J. Larish, 1990, p19 and  Digital Photography, Mikkel Aaland, 1992, p15.  Click on the image above for enlarged view.

Sony MVR-A770 still video recorder/player
 


SONY ProMavica MVC-2000 - 1986.  The MVC-2000 still video camera had a 13X zoom lens and was available only in NTSC.  It was a one-CCD camera of 2/3-inch and 380K pixels.  48mm to 288mm f/1.4 zoom lens.  Shutter 1/15 to 1/1000.  MSRP $3,395. 

A prototype version of the MVC-2000 is the extremely rare MVC-2000 PF, or proofing version.  In the past, Sony often hand-built prototypes of upcoming cameras and distributed them to a few individuals for testing prior to commencing full production. Those prototypes had the PF designation added to the normal model number.  Cameras such as the Nikon QV-1000C which were produced in very small numbers (about 180 units for the QV-1000C) sell for astronomical prices among collectors due to their rarity, however, even 180 units could be considered mass prodution compared to the small number of hand-built prototypes such as the MVC-2000PF. Such being the case, there is virtually no limit on the price a PF version might sell for at auction

Images recorded on the mini discs could be viewed on a TV through use of the still video player. Basic Digital Photography, Norman Breslow, 1991, p79.
http://www.drtomorrow.com/lessons/lessons1/03.html

1986
 

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1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995 A-C
1995 D-Z
1996 A-C
1996 D-N
1996 O-R
1996 S-Z
 1997 A-D
1997 E-H
1997 I-O
 1997 P-Q
 1997 R-S
1997 T-Z
1998 A-D
1998 E-F
1998 G-K
1998 L-N
1998 O-P
1998 Q-R
1998 S
1998 T-Z
1999+
   



Useful Info
History Sites
FINDER